Meet the Maker - Steven Deeble

Meet the Maker - Steven Deeble

Steven Deeble

Meet Steven Deeble, the Writer behind Persistence of Vision

Steven Deeble began writing in earnest in sixth grade, grinding out screenplays and short stories on a cast-iron Underwood typewriter that outweighed him by 80 pounds.
He published ‘Persistence of Vision’, an historical detective thriller taking place across Southern California in 1929, in 2017. The book features characters from the Golden Age of Hollywood including Charlie Chaplin, Stan Laurel, Lon Chaney, and John Barrymore.


Read his story below

How’d you get your start? 

I started writing in sixth grade when I began making films. I had a callous on the side of my finger from holding pencils. My first professional writing appeared in the Los Angeles Times when I was 19. I published my first novel when I was old AF.
Persistence is what it takes. Keep trying to get better. You can’t learn how to be a great writer. You can learn the rudiments, but then you need to work. And work. And work.
I’ve been fortunate that my day job also involves writing. 

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“My perfect day begins with meditation. Then coffee. I read – a mix of fiction and non-fiction, depending on what I’m working on. Then writing.”

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How do you envision your brand growing in the future?

I’ve started the next volume in what is now a series. It started with Persistence of Vision. Now I’m moving the characters that survived the first novel forward from 1929 to 1932, and from the West coast to the East. The backstory is The Bonus March by WWI veterans.   

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“We did the first storytelling event at Elinor on local craft brewing. I became the curator of Riveted and am hoping to see Elinor reopen and storytelling to return.”

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What holds more value for you: creativity or knowledge?

Knowledge is great, but what are you going to do with it? As Carlos Castaneda wrote in The Teachings of Don Juan: A Yaqui Way of Knowledge, “Power rests on the kind of knowledge one holds. What is the sense of knowing things that are useless?”
Creativity leads to transformation. I write about things that raise questions.
You can learn grammar. You can put words together in sentences. But writing is something that comes from practice - from a desire to communicate something.

Describe your day at home or in your workspace?

I’m reorganizing my apartment. Too much stuff. I look like a hoarder. But it’s all art and manuscripts, books - Important stuff.
I’ve been reading about music in preparation for a presentation on film and music that I’m doing for the library. I’ve been watching lots of films to prepare for that in addition to my normal consumption. I’m doing a case study of the Hitchcock/Herrmann collaboration which dovetails nicely with the treatment I’m writing for an homage to Hitchcock that I’d like to shoot in Long Beach late fall/early winter.

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Name one thing you would like to eliminate from your daily schedule to make space for more creative endeavors: “If I could lose the day job, that would rock.”

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If you could move to any other place in this or any universe where would you go?

I’m a fan of New Zealand. It’s ten of the most beautiful places I’ve ever been. But if you can get me on the rocket to Mars, I’m going.